Whom shall I fear?

Psalm 27

1The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? The Lord is the stronghold of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?

2When evildoers assail me to devour my flesh— my adversaries and foes— they shall stumble and fall.

3Though an army encamp against me, my heart shall not fear; though war rise up against me, yet I will be confident.

4One thing I asked of the Lord, that will I seek after: to live in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, to behold the beauty of the Lord, and to inquire in his temple.

5For he will hide me in his shelter in the day of trouble; he will conceal me under the cover of his tent; he will set me high on a rock.

6Now my head is lifted up above my enemies all around me, and I will offer in his tent sacrifices with shouts of joy; I will sing and make melody to the Lord.

            So it has been a while since I last preached.  I hope I can remember how to do this!  We have had two weeks where church has been cancelled because of the snow.  And four weeks ago yesterday, my son Paxton was born.  And to be honest, I haven’t had a good night’s sleep since.  Yesterday at about two o’clock I put him in his snow suit and car seat, not because we were going to go anywhere, but because that seems to be the only place where he will sleep! 

But it is all worth it.  The long nights, changing the diapers, feeding him every three hours only to have him bring part of his meal back up again.  It is all worth it.  I happened to think this week that one of you has a pillow in your house that has embroidered on it “No outfit is complete without cat hair” on it.  I need one that says “No outfit is complete without spit up.”

            Of course, we have at least one million books (conservative estimate) that have been given to us on raising a healthy and happy baby.  And we have enjoyed reading through these books, learning about what is going on with this little man.  We have learned when to feed him, when to put him to sleep, when it is safe for him to sleep through the night, how to get him to sleep through the night, what to dress him in, what to wash his clothes in…the list goes on and on forever!  But one of the most helpful things that I have found was the book that taught us how to discern between the different kinds of cries that he makes.  Paxton will cry in one way because he is hungry.  He will cry in a different way because he needs changed, and still a different way when he is sleepy.  Yet the cry that I still haven’t gotten used to is the cry that he makes when he is afraid.

            When Paxton wakes up after sleeping, and there is nobody else where he can see them, he begins to cry.  He is scared because he doesn’t know that mommy and daddy are just in the next room.  He is scared because he doesn’t realize that we wouldn’t let anything happen to him.  He is scared because all he knows is that he is alone, and he fears what might happen to him.

            As we read through the Bible, we find that “fear” is a common word, being used 326 times and “afraid” is used 206 times in the NIV.  By looking at these usages of these words, we see that fear is something that we can have for God, as we are told to “fear the Lord”, which doesn’t really mean that we are to be shaking in our boots, but to revere Him.  But aside from fearing the Lord, fear is not a quality that we are to seek.  Actually we read about some who were afraid in the Bible and they are not usually commended for that fear.  We read that fear keeps some people, like Joseph of Arimathea, from even letting other people know that he is a follower of Christ.  Fear kept Peter from admitting that he was one of Jesus’ disciples; he actually denied knowing him three times!  Fear kept the disciples locked in a house after Jesus’ crucifixion and even after they began to hear stories of his resurrection.  To fear other people is a bad thing.  As Paul writes in 2 Timothy 1:7, “For God did not give us a spirit of timidity, but a spirit of power, of love and of self-discipline.”

            Today I hope to see that we must do away with fear of other people, but that the opposite of fear is not complacency.  To not fear does not mean that you have an unsafe and unrealistic approach to life, but that you love and trust others.  To not fear does not mean that I hand my kid off to some random stranger on the street and ask him to watch him while I run to the bathroom.  But not fearing means that I can rest assured that in the end, Good does win; that God does win.  So ultimately, we have nothing to fear.

            Today’s scripture is a Psalm credited to King David.  So as we read through this Psalm we need to remember all that David went through in his life.  Before he became king, David was a shepherd who looked after his father’s flock from time to time while his older brothers would have likely been working in the fields.  Now being a shepherd doesn’t sound like a very scary job to me.  Sheep are pretty tame animals; I never wake up in the middle of the night screaming because I was having a bad dream about sheep attacking me.  But we read that during his times watching the sheep, David had to fight off a lion and a bear.  Later in life he was confronted with battling a giant.  When he was anointed to be the next king of the Israelites, he was hunted by a power-crazed king named Saul.  After David became king, he was faced with annihilation from other countries; bigger, larger countries.

            So the life of this simple shepherd boy was really quite eventful.  I have never had to battle a lion, bear, or a giant personally, but I would think that these things would make me a little uneasy.

But perhaps it is exactly because of all that David has lived through that he can say in verse one, “The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? The Lord is the stronghold of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?”  I guess it would be a little easier for David to trust in the Lord to protect him after all that he has been through.  But then again, who here doesn’t have that same reason to trust in the Lord?  Nobody here today or reading this online has ever been in a situation that you have not lived through.  Yes, we will all die one day, but we are still living now.

But that is not to say that we are not going to experience pain through our lives.  David would have gone through more pain than most of us will ever experience.  David was hunted by King Saul, who became jealous of the people’s adoration for him.  David had to hide in caves for an unknown period of time until he heard that Saul had been killed.  Then, after he became king, David had a son through an adulterous relationship with Bathsheba.  And what happened to his son?  He died days after being born.  When David wanted to build the temple in Jerusalem, he was told by a prophet, “No, God doesn’t want you to build him a temple because you are a man of war.”  Essentially, David was being told that he was not good enough to build the temple for God.  Life was not perfect for David.  Yet David put his trust in God and did not fear.  Why do you think that is?

            I don’t read a lot of books of fiction.  It isn’t that I don’t have time or that I don’t see any value in reading them, but for some reason, this genre of literature has never really appealed to me.  But I remember a teacher of mine in High School that told us once that when she begins a book, she might read through the first chapter or two, and then she turns to the end of the book and reads the last chapter.  Many of you are probably thinking “But that will ruin the ending!  What fun is there in spoiling the surprise at the end?”  But my teacher said that if she doesn’t read the ending of a book she will not put down that book until she reads the entire thing.  She doesn’t cook, she doesn’t clean, she doesn’t eat, and she doesn’t sleep.  She will just continue to read the book from cover to cover right through the night because she gets so interested in the plot.  So it is only by reading ahead in the book that she can rest easy.

I think that this is why David is able to rest easy as well.  David is without fear because he knows that in the end God triumphs.  God’s shalom will fill the earth, all things will be made new.  He knows that one day, the lion, much like the one he had to kill, will lie down with the lamb.  It is like David turns ahead and reads the last chapter of the book and knows how things will end. 

This doesn’t mean that there aren’t still a lot of details in the middle that don’t need to be worked out.  David doesn’t know exactly what is going to happen tomorrow, the next week, the next month, or the next year.  That’s why if we were to read on in Psalm 27, we would find that David is pleading with God to be with him, to show David God’s path, and to keep him safe.  Yes, David knows that in the end, God does win out.  He did not fear because he knew that in the end, God would make all things right.  That is why he has the confidence to say, “The Lord is my light and my salvation.  Whom shall I fear?”  But David also knows that he has to continue to hold up his end of the deal as well.  Yes, God wins in the end, but there is a lot of work for David, and for us, until then.

            I guess that what I am trying to say is that knowing how things are going to end is not an excuse for complacency.  I don’t think that David sat back and just allowed God to do all of the work, and I don’t think that we are called to do this either.  Just because we know that God wins does not mean that we don’t participate.  My high school English teach would read the first chapter of a book and then jump ahead to the final chapter, but she would always go back and read the middle of the book as well.  The stuff in the middle, though it may not change the fact that God wins in the end, is necessary for us to understand the ending.  It is necessary for us to get to the ending.

            So we are to find ourselves somewhere between being afraid and being complacent.  We are to reside within this tension.  Unfortunately, I believe that a lot of people in our world today tend to lean toward fear.  Is that really such a bad thing?  Yes, because fear is debilitating, it is crushing, and it will cause us to live in strained relationships with the very people that God created us to love.

            I never had to walk home from school as a boy, but I hear that bullies can be a problem.  Imagine you are a scrawny little boy still waiting on a growth spurt.  Everyday on the way to school, the school bully waits for you to rough you up a bit, take your lunch money, and embarrass you in front of the girl that you like.  You are afraid of that bully.  So what do you do?  You begin to hate that bully.  And you talk bad about that bully.  And you begin to plot revenge against that bully.  And you begin to go a long way out of your way to school to avoid that bully.  When someone is able to control your fear, they can control you.

            Fearing that bully is going to mess with your mind.  That isn’t to say that you should just go ahead and get beat up every day.  But you should not fear him.  Fear leads to hate.  And we are not to hate our enemies.  We are to love our enemies.

If you follow world news, you probably heard this week about how Iran’s president Ahmadinejad recently announced that his country will enriching uranium at a higher level for medical research.  And many people began to call this into question because enriched uranium can be used in nuclear weapons.  Should we fear Ahmadinejad?  No, because the worst thing that he can do is to take away our lives.  And if we truly believe in a resurrection, then what do we have to fear?  Now should we ignore Ahmadinejad?  No, because the opposite of fear is not complacency.

            When we fear a man like Ahmadinejad, we don’t just avoid walking home past him after school.  We do something much worse.  We demonize him, making him into something less than human.  We use derogatory terms to describe him.  And when we begin thinking of someone as less than human, it becomes a lot easier to hate them and be willing to kill them.  I have pictures that were used during WWII as propaganda against the Germans.  And it is meant to make Americans hate the Germans and to demonize and dehumanize them so that more Americans would kill more Germans.

Yes, I think that American needed to do something to stop Hitler and I believe that we should do something to stop Ahmadinejad.  But is Ahmadinejad human?  Yes!  He is a human being that God created in his own image.  He is a human being that Jesus came to the earth, suffered, and died for.  He is a human being made of flesh and blood just like you and me.  And what does Paul tell us in Ephesians 6:12?  “For our struggle is not against enemies of blood and flesh, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers of this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places.”

            On a lighter note, the Republicans fear the Democrats and the Democrats fear the Republicans and everyone fears Sarah Palin.  During the recent Tea Party Convention in Tennessee, Sarah Palin was caught using notes that were written on her hand.  Further investigation found that she had written herself some crib notes saying “energy,” “tax cuts,” and “lift American spirit.”

            The Obama administration jumped on this because of comments that Palin had made about Obama’s use of a teleprompter.  Then on Saturday I saw a conservative news program report for what seemed like a long time about a former Democratic candidate that had notes written on her hand.  Back and forth, back and forth.  I believe that because Democrats fear Republicans and Republicans fear Democrats, we do another “D” word.  We demean one another.

            To demean someone means that you take away from their dignity.  We try to make them look less intelligent, less suitable for the job.  But guess what, people that we disagree with are often intelligent people as well.  But when we yell past one another, calling people names, mocking them, questioning their intelligence, we are demeaning them and treating them as less than people created in the image of God; people that Jesus came to die for.

            We as Christians cannot allow ourselves to get caught up in all of this fear-mongering found in the media.  And it comes from both sides.  We call names because we are trying to get other people to fear people on the other end of the political spectrum.  We demonize them, we demean them, we look at them as something less than human beings created in the image of God; human beings for whom Jesus suffered and died.

            I am not afraid of Ahmadinejad.  I am not afraid of the Republicans or the Democrats.  I am not afraid because I know that in the end, God will set all things right.  But remember, the opposite of fear is not complacency.  Just because I don’t fear Ahmadinejad, Obama, or Palin, doesn’t mean that I am not aware of what is going on and try to have a conversation when I believe that they have gone astray.  But we as Christians must do so without demonizing and demeaning others these things come from fear, a fear that is unwarranted.

            When Paxton wakes up after one of his short naps and screams out loud because he is afraid, I realize that he can’t see the entire picture.  He can’t see that his daddy is right there with him.  Even when he cannot see me, I am there protecting him.  No harm is going to come to him.  But he can’t understand that at this time.  He cannot grasp that fear is not necessary.  How much more does our loving Father in heaven care for and protect us.  So I say with David, “The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear?” 

Psalm 27

1The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? The Lord is the stronghold of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?

2When evildoers assail me to devour my flesh— my adversaries and foes— they shall stumble and fall.

3Though an army encamp against me, my heart shall not fear; though war rise up against me, yet I will be confident.

4One thing I asked of the Lord, that will I seek after: to live in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, to behold the beauty of the Lord, and to inquire in his temple.

5For he will hide me in his shelter in the day of trouble; he will conceal me under the cover of his tent; he will set me high on a rock.

6Now my head is lifted up above my enemies all around me, and I will offer in his tent sacrifices with shouts of joy; I will sing and make melody to the Lord.

 

            So it has been a while since I last preached.  I hope I can remember how to do this!  We have had two weeks where church has been cancelled because of the snow.  And four weeks ago yesterday, my son Paxton was born.  And to be honest, I haven’t had a good night’s sleep since.  Yesterday at about two o’clock I put him in his snow suit and car seat, not because we were going to go anywhere, but because that seems to be the only place where he will sleep! 

But it is all worth it.  The long nights, changing the diapers, feeding him every three hours only to have him bring part of his meal back up again.  It is all worth it.  I happened to think this week that one of you has a pillow in your house that has embroidered on it “No outfit is complete without cat hair” on it.  I need one that says “No outfit is complete without spit up.”

            Of course, we have at least one million books (conservative estimate) that have been given to us on raising a healthy and happy baby.  And we have enjoyed reading through these books, learning about what is going on with this little man.  We have learned when to feed him, when to put him to sleep, when it is safe for him to sleep through the night, how to get him to sleep through the night, what to dress him in, what to wash his clothes in…the list goes on and on forever!  But one of the most helpful things that I have found was the book that taught us how to discern between the different kinds of cries that he makes.  Paxton will cry in one way because he is hungry.  He will cry in a different way because he needs changed, and still a different way when he is sleepy.  Yet the cry that I still haven’t gotten used to is the cry that he makes when he is afraid.

            When Paxton wakes up after sleeping, and there is nobody else where he can see them, he begins to cry.  He is scared because he doesn’t know that mommy and daddy are just in the next room.  He is scared because he doesn’t realize that we wouldn’t let anything happen to him.  He is scared because all he knows is that he is alone, and he fears what might happen to him.

            As we read through the Bible, we find that “fear” is a common word, being used 326 times and “afraid” is used 206 times in the NIV.  By looking at these usages of these words, we see that fear is something that we can have for God, as we are told to “fear the Lord”, which doesn’t really mean that we are to be shaking in our boots, but to revere Him.  But aside from fearing the Lord, fear is not a quality that we are to seek.  Actually we read about some who were afraid in the Bible and they are not usually commended for that fear.  We read that fear keeps some people, like Joseph of Arimathea, from even letting other people know that he is a follower of Christ.  Fear kept Peter from admitting that he was one of Jesus’ disciples; he actually denied knowing him three times!  Fear kept the disciples locked in a house after Jesus’ crucifixion and even after they began to hear stories of his resurrection.  To fear other people is a bad thing.  As Paul writes in 2 Timothy 1:7, “For God did not give us a spirit of timidity, but a spirit of power, of love and of self-discipline.”

            Today I hope to see that we must do away with fear of other people, but that the opposite of fear is not complacency.  To not fear does not mean that you have an unsafe and unrealistic approach to life, but that you love and trust others.  To not fear does not mean that I hand my kid off to some random stranger on the street and ask him to watch him while I run to the bathroom.  But not fearing means that I can rest assured that in the end, Good does win; that God does win.  So ultimately, we have nothing to fear.

            Today’s scripture is a Psalm credited to King David.  So as we read through this Psalm we need to remember all that David went through in his life.  Before he became king, David was a shepherd who looked after his father’s flock from time to time while his older brothers would have likely been working in the fields.  Now being a shepherd doesn’t sound like a very scary job to me.  Sheep are pretty tame animals; I never wake up in the middle of the night screaming because I was having a bad dream about sheep attacking me.  But we read that during his times watching the sheep, David had to fight off a lion and a bear.  Later in life he was confronted with battling a giant.  When he was anointed to be the next king of the Israelites, he was hunted by a power-crazed king named Saul.  After David became king, he was faced with annihilation from other countries; bigger, larger countries.

            So the life of this simple shepherd boy was really quite eventful.  I have never had to battle a lion, bear, or a giant personally, but I would think that these things would make me a little uneasy.

But perhaps it is exactly because of all that David has lived through that he can say in verse one, “The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? The Lord is the stronghold of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?”  I guess it would be a little easier for David to trust in the Lord to protect him after all that he has been through.  But then again, who here doesn’t have that same reason to trust in the Lord?  Nobody here today or reading this online has ever been in a situation that you have not lived through.  Yes, we will all die one day, but we are still living now.

But that is not to say that we are not going to experience pain through our lives.  David would have gone through more pain than most of us will ever experience.  David was hunted by King Saul, who became jealous of the people’s adoration for him.  David had to hide in caves for an unknown period of time until he heard that Saul had been killed.  Then, after he became king, David had a son through an adulterous relationship with Bathsheba.  And what happened to his son?  He died days after being born.  When David wanted to build the temple in Jerusalem, he was told by a prophet, “No, God doesn’t want you to build him a temple because you are a man of war.”  Essentially, David was being told that he was not good enough to build the temple for God.  Life was not perfect for David.  Yet David put his trust in God and did not fear.  Why do you think that is?

            I don’t read a lot of books of fiction.  It isn’t that I don’t have time or that I don’t see any value in reading them, but for some reason, this genre of literature has never really appealed to me.  But I remember a teacher of mine in High School that told us once that when she begins a book, she might read through the first chapter or two, and then she turns to the end of the book and reads the last chapter.  Many of you are probably thinking “But that will ruin the ending!  What fun is there in spoiling the surprise at the end?”  But my teacher said that if she doesn’t read the ending of a book she will not put down that book until she reads the entire thing.  She doesn’t cook, she doesn’t clean, she doesn’t eat, and she doesn’t sleep.  She will just continue to read the book from cover to cover right through the night because she gets so interested in the plot.  So it is only by reading ahead in the book that she can rest easy.

I think that this is why David is able to rest easy as well.  David is without fear because he knows that in the end God triumphs.  God’s shalom will fill the earth, all things will be made new.  He knows that one day, the lion, much like the one he had to kill, will lie down with the lamb.  It is like David turns ahead and reads the last chapter of the book and knows how things will end. 

This doesn’t mean that there aren’t still a lot of details in the middle that don’t need to be worked out.  David doesn’t know exactly what is going to happen tomorrow, the next week, the next month, or the next year.  That’s why if we were to read on in Psalm 27, we would find that David is pleading with God to be with him, to show David God’s path, and to keep him safe.  Yes, David knows that in the end, God does win out.  He did not fear because he knew that in the end, God would make all things right.  That is why he has the confidence to say, “The Lord is my light and my salvation.  Whom shall I fear?”  But David also knows that he has to continue to hold up his end of the deal as well.  Yes, God wins in the end, but there is a lot of work for David, and for us, until then.

            I guess that what I am trying to say is that knowing how things are going to end is not an excuse for complacency.  I don’t think that David sat back and just allowed God to do all of the work, and I don’t think that we are called to do this either.  Just because we know that God wins does not mean that we don’t participate.  My high school English teach would read the first chapter of a book and then jump ahead to the final chapter, but she would always go back and read the middle of the book as well.  The stuff in the middle, though it may not change the fact that God wins in the end, is necessary for us to understand the ending.  It is necessary for us to get to the ending.

            So we are to find ourselves somewhere between being afraid and being complacent.  We are to reside within this tension.  Unfortunately, I believe that a lot of people in our world today tend to lean toward fear.  Is that really such a bad thing?  Yes, because fear is debilitating, it is crushing, and it will cause us to live in strained relationships with the very people that God created us to love.

            I never had to walk home from school as a boy, but I hear that bullies can be a problem.  Imagine you are a scrawny little boy still waiting on a growth spurt.  Everyday on the way to school, the school bully waits for you to rough you up a bit, take your lunch money, and embarrass you in front of the girl that you like.  You are afraid of that bully.  So what do you do?  You begin to hate that bully.  And you talk bad about that bully.  And you begin to plot revenge against that bully.  And you begin to go a long way out of your way to school to avoid that bully.  When someone is able to control your fear, they can control you.

            Fearing that bully is going to mess with your mind.  That isn’t to say that you should just go ahead and get beat up every day.  But you should not fear him.  Fear leads to hate.  And we are not to hate our enemies.  We are to love our enemies.

If you follow world news, you probably heard this week about how Iran’s president Ahmadinejad recently announced that his country will enriching uranium at a higher level for medical research.  And many people began to call this into question because enriched uranium can be used in nuclear weapons.  Should we fear Ahmadinejad?  No, because the worst thing that he can do is to take away our lives.  And if we truly believe in a resurrection, then what do we have to fear?  Now should we ignore Ahmadinejad?  No, because the opposite of fear is not complacency.

            When we fear a man like Ahmadinejad, we don’t just avoid walking home past him after school.  We do something much worse.  We demonize him, making him into something less than human.  We use derogatory terms to describe him.  And when we begin thinking of someone as less than human, it becomes a lot easier to hate them and be willing to kill them.  I have pictures that were used during WWII as propaganda against the Germans.  And it is meant to make Americans hate the Germans and to demonize and dehumanize them so that more Americans would kill more Germans.

Yes, I think that American needed to do something to stop Hitler and I believe that we should do something to stop Ahmadinejad.  But is Ahmadinejad human?  Yes!  He is a human being that God created in his own image.  He is a human being that Jesus came to the earth, suffered, and died for.  He is a human being made of flesh and blood just like you and me.  And what does Paul tell us in Ephesians 6:12?  For our struggle is not against enemies of blood and flesh, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers of this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places.”

            On a lighter note, the Republicans fear the Democrats and the Democrats fear the Republicans and everyone fears Sarah Palin.  During the recent Tea Party Convention in Tennessee, Sarah Palin was caught using notes that were written on her hand.  Further investigation found that she had written herself some crib notes saying “energy,” “tax cuts,” and “lift American spirit.”

            The Obama administration jumped on this because of comments that Palin had made about Obama’s use of a teleprompter.  Then on Saturday I saw a conservative news program report for what seemed like a long time about a former Democratic candidate that had notes written on her hand.  Back and forth, back and forth.  I believe that because Democrats fear Republicans and Republicans fear Democrats, we do another “D” word.  We demean one another.

            To demean someone means that you take away from their dignity.  We try to make them look less intelligent, less suitable for the job.  But guess what, people that we disagree with are often intelligent people as well.  But when we yell past one another, calling people names, mocking them, questioning their intelligence, we are demeaning them and treating them as less than people created in the image of God; people that Jesus came to die for.

            We as Christians cannot allow ourselves to get caught up in all of this fear-mongering found in the media.  And it comes from both sides.  We call names because we are trying to get other people to fear people on the other end of the political spectrum.  We demonize them, we demean them, we look at them as something less than human beings created in the image of God; human beings for whom Jesus suffered and died.

            I am not afraid of Ahmadinejad.  I am not afraid of the Republicans or the Democrats.  I am not afraid because I know that in the end, God will set all things right.  But remember, the opposite of fear is not complacency.  Just because I don’t fear Ahmadinejad, Obama, or Palin, doesn’t mean that I am not aware of what is going on and try to have a conversation when I believe that they have gone astray.  But we as Christians must do so without demonizing and demeaning others these things come from fear, a fear that is unwarranted.

            When Paxton wakes up after one of his short naps and screams out loud because he is afraid, I realize that he can’t see the entire picture.  He can’t see that his daddy is right there with him.  Even when he cannot see me, I am there protecting him.  No harm is going to come to him.  But he can’t understand that at this time.  He cannot grasp that fear is not necessary.  How much more does our loving Father in heaven care for and protect us.  So I say with David, “The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear?”

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About Kevin Gasser

I envision this site to be a place where I can post my weekly sermon text and invite feedback from anyone who is interested in the church, theology, or life in general. Please note that these sermons are rough drafts of what I plan to say from the pulpit, so typos are common.
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